2011 Baume Travel Grant

Benjawan Tawatsupa attended a training course at Umea University in Sweden

Attending this course was a chance to exchange knowledge, research results and experiences about climate change and health impacts with the participants from other countries

I have attended the training course on “Climate change and health – Research methods” at Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umea University, Umeå, Sweden  during 3–16 June 2012.  I would like to thank the Baume Travel Grant from the National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health for kindly supporting me with my travelling costs to attend this course.

There were 22 participants attending this training course including PhD students and researchers working in the area of climate change and health from many countries, especially from developing countries. This training course is very useful for my PhD study as they focused about research methods for determining the effects of climate change on health that I can apply them in my PhD thesis.

The subjects in this course included techniques for attribution of risk/cause and effect, dealing with uncertainty and unusually large temporal and spatial scales, working with multi-sectorial datasets (e.g. meteorology, physical geography, agriculture and health) as well as using longitudinal data sets, both retrospectively and prospectively. Everyday after the lecture, there were group works and group discussions. These activities were very helpful to remind and summary what we have learned in that day.

Finally, all participants got individual homework assignment to develop a research proposal about climate change and health and had to present it at the end of the course. The research topic for this proposed study should be planed for a (post-) doctoral project that each of participant wish to carry out in the future. For my proposed study, I have prepared a draft of my research proposal by working together with one researcher from Ghana who has the same research interested about heat stress and occupational injury and heat-related health outcomes. So, our proposed research topic is “Effects of heat stress on occupational injury and ill-health in tropical countries and implications of climate change”.

I also had a good chance to make a network with new friends who are working in the same research area. The benefit from attending this course is also a chance to exchange knowledge, research results and experiences about climate change and health impacts with the participants from other countries.  

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